Author Topic: Can I borrow someones NSU Clutch tool?  (Read 2581 times)

adi

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Can I borrow someones NSU Clutch tool?
« on: July 02, 2011, 05:55:30 PM »
As the title says really. Anyone happen to have a clutch removal tool for the Prinz? I tried every which way to get the clutch off, I don't think its possible without either having the tool, or breaking something.

I know you can buy them from various sources, but nsu-autotiele is down at the moment, and I am not in the UK club, and I only need it for one job anyway.

I will pay for postage both ways which will be insured to however much it costs to buy a new one, and can paypal you a deposit if you want, or whatever.

Anybody got one they could let me borrow for a day.

Thanks!

Barry

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Re: Can I borrow someones NSU Clutch tool?
« Reply #1 on: July 03, 2011, 07:19:15 AM »
I have a Prinz (but no clutch tool).  I am not yet in the club but they have been really helpful (I will join).  Why not drop Rosie & Glenn an email and ask, they are bound to be able to source one quickly.  You may decide to join.

nsuoc@btinternet.com

Daniel Rodd

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Re: Can I borrow someones NSU Clutch tool?
« Reply #2 on: July 03, 2011, 12:11:34 PM »
if you own something like a prinz it really does make a lot of sense to join the club,theres probably someone in it who would loan you the tool,worth the fees in itself.

richard

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Re: Can I borrow someones NSU Clutch tool?
« Reply #3 on: July 03, 2011, 05:08:28 PM »
i did think the same daniel , surely more likely there than here but al has already been of help to adi so .....
outside of a dog a book is mans best friend. Inside of a dog it's too dark to read .Groucho Marx 1895-1977

adi

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Re: Can I borrow someones NSU Clutch tool?
« Reply #4 on: July 04, 2011, 01:02:13 PM »
Thanks very much for the replies. Yes, I know about the club.

I was wandering if anybody HERE happened to have that tool.

Alternatively, does anybody know what thread is on the inside of the flywheel? I can't really get decent access to it, it looks like 2mm pitch, but what diameter? Unfortunately it's bigger then a VW beetle gland nut (which is probably the biggest fine thread I have), thats pretty much all I compared it to so far. Looks about 30mm?

If I could find out what thread it is, I could just make a tool next time im at the machine shop, assuming that old 100-yr-old piece of crap lathe can even do mm threads (we all love it really).

Big Al

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Re: Can I borrow someones NSU Clutch tool?
« Reply #5 on: July 04, 2011, 08:22:25 PM »
No idea what NSU tools I have but I do not lend tools out as they either do not come back and if they do they are often broken. I can supply a list of none returned tools and a few are to members of this forum! The minimum I will do is allow people to use them at my home if they have the relevant ability not to trash the things. They were the tools of my trade and my view has not altered since then. Sorry.
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adi

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Re: Can I borrow someones NSU Clutch tool?
« Reply #6 on: July 05, 2011, 11:54:50 AM »
Ok, well, thanks for the replies. I guess I will have to buy one.

I let people borrow special tools all the time. Right now my tube-socket de-soldering bit, pre-67 beetle stubborn drum puller, VW engine case disassembly tool, VW flywheel locker tool, and possible a couple of clutch alignment tools, are all being borrowed by random people (one is in the US!). It's what being into classic cars is all about, folks help each other out. Just like some random person in Worcester who I don't even know would have been royally screwd without my post-67 4-stud drum remover tool, I would have been royally screwd without a VW Type IV ball joint popper owned by somebody from Canada.

As long as they paypal me a deposit that's equal to either the purchase price of a new tool, or if one can't be bought, the cost of making a new one, and pay for shipping both ways, with insurance to the value of the tool, then it don't really matter if they trash or lose it or something, or the postal service loses it. There is no risk to me, and all I need to do is walk to a post office, which I would gladly do if it helps someone somewhere fix an old car.

I for one am proud to do my bit to support this culture.

Bob Purton

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Re: Can I borrow someones NSU Clutch tool?
« Reply #7 on: July 05, 2011, 12:25:27 PM »
Oh stop belly aching Adi. The Prinz is not a common car amoungst Rumcar folk because of them being big, more a mini car really, only one person woudnt lend you the tool, if 50 of us had the tool 49 would have probably loaned it to you. Its like asking the Morris Marina club for a ford escort puller. If you went to the NSU club first the job would have been done by now, if you are going to keep the car thats the way to go anyway. Need a Messerschmitt flywheel puller? Just ask and you will recieve!

richard

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Re: Can I borrow someones NSU Clutch tool?
« Reply #8 on: July 05, 2011, 12:37:04 PM »
i was thinking along similar lines adi. just looked through your posts when you joined and had the scootacar . your posts were more interesting then  :) find another scootacar to make better reading for us we dont know NSU's  ;D
outside of a dog a book is mans best friend. Inside of a dog it's too dark to read .Groucho Marx 1895-1977

P50

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Re: Can I borrow someones NSU Clutch tool?
« Reply #9 on: July 05, 2011, 01:04:06 PM »
i was thinking along similar lines adi. just looked through your posts when you joined and had the scootacar . your posts were more interesting then  :) find another scootacar to make better reading for us we dont know NSU's  ;D

Yep a Scootacar is an unusual microcar.  In fact arent all microcars by definition unusual?

Anyway NSU's, Fiat 500's,  Jap 660's are simply small but largely conventional cars.  A microcar is invariably powered by an engine related more to a motorcycle than to a car.

Shame you sold the Mk1.  That was a great find especialy as you met the original lady owner etc..
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adi

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Re: Can I borrow someones NSU Clutch tool?
« Reply #10 on: July 05, 2011, 05:47:20 PM »
I aint moaning, everything is good, I ordered a tool, and the circle of life continues.

Actually, its odd that you should mention that the prinz is a 'small normal car'. One of the biggest impressions I got of the Prinz is that its built more like a big/very advanced bubble car then a 'small conventional car'. Maybe that's just my opinion tho. Usually, 'small conventional cars' are just smaller cars along the trend of the VW beetle, things like the Fiat 500 and all the other small RR fiats, the smaller Renaults, the soviet Zapo, even the Hillman Imp to an extent, seem to all have the same basic layout as a beetle. They have a conventional starter and reasonably conventional alternator or generator, and the engine is fitted long-ways driving an in-line gearbox which is in front of it, under the rear seat.

The Prinz however, is more like a bubble car, with it's strange toy-size alloy brake drums, kingpins, it's rear suspension which basically relies on bushes flexing to be the pivot, and various things like that. And of course the engine, fitted sideways with integral gearbox sharing the same oil, which looks like it belongs in a motorbike, and has a combined starter/generator, like a lot of bubble cars do.

It is by all accounts a very odd design.

But very cool nevertheless. Build quality seems very good, and everything about it looks like its built by someone who knew what they were doing (except the engine, what a pig to work on).

P50

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Re: Can I borrow someones NSU Clutch tool?
« Reply #11 on: July 06, 2011, 09:04:59 AM »
The Germans don't do bad build quality. Or should I say in the 50's / 60's it was peerless and unequaled.  The Japs were getting in the game but the Krauts knew nothing but perfection material wise etc.

That's why the KR's etc are so good to work on..
« Last Edit: July 06, 2011, 09:06:51 AM by P50 »
"Men of worth act like men of worth, and men of genius, who produce
things beautiful and excellent, shine forth far better when other people
praise them than when they boast so confidently of their own achievements."
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Big Al

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Re: Can I borrow someones NSU Clutch tool?
« Reply #12 on: July 06, 2011, 01:30:48 PM »
Well I do not know about others but the German engineer is a respected individual on a level with other qualified professionals. They seem to have had a good representation in running businesses such as car production. This gave the ability to argue with the bean counters and retain quality and integrity on the production line so fulfilling most of the design concept from the drawing board and prototype stages. Citroen was so subservient to the engineers it was able to produce three ground breaking cars but it was eventually driven bankrupt by the quest for engineering answers that possibly no one actually wanted. In Britain the engineer is not given his due and accountants ran the business of production. They cut corners and reduced quality and integrity of design meaning potential world beaters like the Maxi went down as a bit of a failure. INdeed they managed to sell the MIni at a loss they were so incompetent! Having squandered the talents of the initiated staff and made a lot of rubbish it is not surprising that eventually even the most loyal customers looked elsewhere for their new cars. This is somewhat mirrored in microcars with both the British versions of Heinkel and Isetta not really being as good as the original German versions and so on.
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