Author Topic: sending or receiving engines by carrier/ post whatever ?  (Read 2520 times)

richard

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does anyone have recent experience of selling or buying a small motorcycle. microcar engine ? how does it have to be presented to a carrier ? in a home made crate ? bubble wrapped ? vinegar and brown paper ? thanks
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marcus

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Re: sending or receiving engines by carrier/ post whatever ?
« Reply #1 on: May 24, 2014, 01:52:17 PM »
I have never sent an engine but have sent plenty of big drums so I should imagine they are about the same. Some couriers give advice on their site. I reckon loads of bubble wrap then a stout cardboard box or wooden crate. Drain it thoroughly first!
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Rusty Chrome (Malcolm Parker)

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Re: sending or receiving engines by carrier/ post whatever ?
« Reply #2 on: May 24, 2014, 03:13:30 PM »
Hi Richard this is really one of those "how long is a piece of string" questions. Everything depends on the courier and the value of the engine. Some couriers gently convey your precious items in cossetted surroundings others may sling it in the back with a load of razor sharp sheet steel and kick it off the back of the wagon when it reaches it's destination. My advice is to seek advice from the courier and that the packaging is usually the cheapest part! If you can't get any more feedback from the courier, and you've got the time, material and resources, go for a decent wooden crate, otherwise, second choice - layer or two of bubble wrap (depending on it's size and quality) wrapped around the engine in an oversize cardboard box packed out on all sides with polystyrene chippings. Third, enough layers of bubble wrap to see off a good kick.
Malcolm
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Jim Janecek

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Re: sending or receiving engines by carrier/ post whatever ?
« Reply #3 on: May 24, 2014, 06:58:12 PM »
Depending on the engine, there is a lot of "mass" to it so that "if" it is dropped or mis-handled the potential energy built up from raising it above the floor will be released as kinetic energy. 
That energy must go someplace. 
Your packing must assume that this item will be dropped at some point. 
It must have packing not just to prevent nicks and scuffs, but the packing must be able to absorb ALL the kinetic energy released if dropped. The packaging does this by deforming when impacted. Ideally the if package should show up to it's destination looking all damaged, the packaging will have taken the brunt of the energy and sacrificed itself to protect the contents.

simply putting a bit of bubble wrap around it is nice if you are personally transporting it, but once it leaves your hands, never trust the courier to handle it as you might.

If you cannot strap the engine down to a wood frame of some sort, strap it to a small tyre, then wrap that and box it.  The tyre provides a very strong cushion against shock and is flexible. Old used tyres are great for transporting small engines around in vehicles so they don't roll and don't get damaged.

I have sent an Isetta engine to Mexico once and made a wood crate for it.  The engine was bolted to the crate and then put inside a sturdy cardboard box with solid slabs of 2" thick styrofoam sheeting surrounding it.  It arrived safely despite being delivered to the wrong destination, unpacked and then re-packed.
There is one guy in the USA that works on Isetta engines and he has a couple of wood crates made up for proper shipping. He will ship you the empty crate, you bolt your engine into it and then send it back.

If you are having someone ELSE send you an engine, don't trust they will pack it properly. You might have to make a container for it and send it to them. 
I once bought a rear window glass for a bubble window Isetta from someone who said they would not ship it because they could not figure out how to package it.  I happened to have a sample piece of glass (very large and unwieldily), made a cardboard box container lined with plenty of styrofoam and sent it to the seller. He just dropped the glass into the box, sealed it up and took it to FedEx after I gave him a little extra money.  It arrived safely and eventually went to a friend in Italy in that box.

Bob Purton

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Re: sending or receiving engines by carrier/ post whatever ?
« Reply #4 on: May 24, 2014, 09:57:39 PM »
If you are talking about within the uk, some carriers will take engines strapped to a pallet.

marcus

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Re: sending or receiving engines by carrier/ post whatever ?
« Reply #5 on: May 25, 2014, 08:08:47 AM »
Jim is right about absorbing energy. My heavier drums go out with a lot of bubblewrap or foam around them, then into a box, then more bubble/foam, then an outer box.

One shipper in Texas did some spectacular damage to one of my timpani (kettle drums) heading to a customer in LA. It looked like they had got a whaler's Harpoon Gun and fired a harpoon right through the box, with the explosive head going off inside it!

Despite all the horror stories most of my parcels (to and from me) have arrived safe and sound, but you have to allow for the worst eventuality.

Like someone firing a harpoon gun at your engine!


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marcus

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Re: sending or receiving engines by carrier/ post whatever ?
« Reply #6 on: May 26, 2014, 12:44:31 PM »
Another useful packaging material: foam plumbing pipe insulation sleeving.  Wrap it around protruberances, pack rods and cables in it, wrap it around the edges of your cymbals, use it as a space filler in boxes, etc..
Just remember: as one door closes behind you, another slams in your face