Author Topic: Isetta steering worms.  (Read 11628 times)

AndyL

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Re: Isetta steering worms.
« Reply #15 on: March 05, 2015, 08:31:38 AM »
Easy enouh for me to make a custom mandrel so that it locates accurately in the centre of the steering column- got a decent sized lathe and know how to use it.

Took me a morning to get the pesky swivel bolt off the steering column which bolts to the dashboard.

I know it'll all go back together a lot easier than it came apart, all the bits will be greased for a start!
1959 LHD 3-wheel Isetta.

Bob Purton

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Re: Isetta steering worms.
« Reply #16 on: March 05, 2015, 09:37:40 AM »
Its good to hear you have the acme cut steering worm, they all say its the better of the two.

Big Al

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Re: Isetta steering worms.
« Reply #17 on: March 05, 2015, 11:08:58 AM »
So meep meep to the coyote version it is!
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Jim Janecek

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Re: Isetta steering worms.
« Reply #18 on: March 05, 2015, 02:10:24 PM »
I know exactly what you're talking about, but I don't really have the space for a tool like that- I've seen the size of the garages you folks have in the US.
There is also a hydraulic press I can access at work, so I might give that a go. I take it you pressed against the bottom of the aluminium hub?

The press I am talking about is rather small, between 4-5 ft tall and 2 ft wide, 2ft deep max:
http://www.harborfreight.com/12-ton-shop-press-33497.html
You could probably rig up something with a bottle jack just for this if you wanted to, then dismantle it after the wheel is freed up.

If go the press route, have the assembly resting on blocking from either side with the bottom of the wheel resting on the blocking and the shaft passing through and hanging down.
Leave the nut on the top of shaft for now and press down on that.  The wheel stays stationary and the shaft is then pushed down.
Leaving the nut in place serves 2 purposes:
1: When it frees up, it prevents the shaft from dropping through and clunking on the floor
2: It prevents the threads on the top of the shaft from mushrooming or deforming due to the pressure of the press.

AndyL

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Re: Isetta steering worms.
« Reply #19 on: March 05, 2015, 03:49:01 PM »
Yes that's how I thought it would look, very similar to the one at work. Really haven't got the space for that. I'll make something up or use the one work.

Question, did you make a cradle to support the underside of the wheel? The aluminium steering shaft bushing will only move down the shaft about quarter of an inch or so before it jams up, so not much clearance underneath. The wheel hub is soft aluminium so I don't want to damage it, thinking of maybe turning up a cradle from some hardwood.
« Last Edit: March 05, 2015, 04:19:01 PM by AndyL »
1959 LHD 3-wheel Isetta.

Jim Janecek

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Re: Isetta steering worms.
« Reply #20 on: March 05, 2015, 04:38:50 PM »
Question, did you make a cradle to support the underside of the wheel? The aluminium steering shaft bushing will only move down the shaft about quarter of an inch or so before it jams up, so not much clearance underneath.

hmmm, that's right, the aluminum cast piece has to be removed from above and the wheel is in the way.
It has been awhile since I did this. 
Regardless, I used the pair of cast iron blocks with notches (you can see them on the pic of the press if you click the pic) to support the wheel from the hub while letting the shaft pass through.  I probably spanned the aluminum piece and then put some chunks of 1/4" steel bar in there to finish the span so that the blocking supported the wheel hub only before pressing.


AndyL

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Re: Isetta steering worms.
« Reply #21 on: March 05, 2015, 04:54:54 PM »
Okey dokey. So basically a split hub supporting the underneath, it seems I'm going about things the right way then.
1959 LHD 3-wheel Isetta.

AndyL

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Re: Isetta steering worms.
« Reply #22 on: March 07, 2015, 09:20:04 PM »
Got my wheel off okay. I used a large two leg puller in the end, with a custom split plate that bolted together underneath the wheel.

I used a bit of heat to expand the aluminium hub, but nothing drastic. Came off with a sudden pop.   :)
1959 LHD 3-wheel Isetta.

Bob Purton

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Re: Isetta steering worms.
« Reply #23 on: March 07, 2015, 09:31:50 PM »
Well done Andy.  I have only this week put mine on, left job almost until last in case in had to come off again and ruin the paint!

AndyL

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Re: Isetta steering worms.
« Reply #24 on: March 08, 2015, 07:54:50 PM »
I took my steering/pedal box off today.

Like everything else on this little critter, it's jammed up- the pedals move fine, but the bolt/shaft that runs through them all is stuck firm inside the aluminium housing.

I have a good spare, which I intend to use, as it's in better nick anyway. However interestingly I found there was a variation in the two aluminium castings. The one on my car had the rod completely enclosed inside the aluminium housing, whereas my spare had it exposed once it went into the aperture for the steering gear.

Not sure why or when the design was changed, but just another little mystery thrown up.
1959 LHD 3-wheel Isetta.

AndyL

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Re: Isetta steering worms.
« Reply #25 on: March 09, 2015, 04:05:50 PM »
1959 LHD 3-wheel Isetta.

Bob Purton

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Re: Isetta steering worms.
« Reply #26 on: March 09, 2015, 05:58:59 PM »
I would imagine the one with the partially exposed shaft would be less prone to seize up and could share a little grease that is packed around the worm and nut. Other than that I cant think of any reason why they would have made the two types. I wonder which one came first?
I cant say I noticed which type my car has when I removed that part.
« Last Edit: March 09, 2015, 06:01:06 PM by Bob Purton »

AndyL

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Re: Isetta steering worms.
« Reply #27 on: March 09, 2015, 06:26:08 PM »
Looking at some period photographs, it seems the box with the exposed shaft is more in keeping a with a sliding window car, and the other unit was fitted on earlier cars like the bubble window vehicles.

As so many people say, is there such a thing as an original Isetta? They seemed to throw on whatever they could lay their mitts on. Does make me laugh though, you just don't get those sort of idiosyncrasies with modern cars.
1959 LHD 3-wheel Isetta.

richard

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Re: Isetta steering worms.
« Reply #28 on: March 09, 2015, 07:44:18 PM »
but in 60 years time will we all be discussing the merits of a '14 Skoda Octavia over a '64 Audi - I doubt it
outside of a dog a book is mans best friend. Inside of a dog it's too dark to read .Groucho Marx 1895-1977

AndyL

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Re: Isetta steering worms.
« Reply #29 on: March 09, 2015, 07:47:13 PM »
In 60 years time, it's doubtful 'we' will be discussing anything at all!  ;D

1959 LHD 3-wheel Isetta.