Author Topic: Mini Comtesse Help!  (Read 1788 times)

angus fognozzle

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Mini Comtesse Help!
« on: February 18, 2017, 07:02:55 PM »
Illustrated the point (once again!) that e-bay and alcohol make a dangerous combination;
I am now the proud owner of a Mini Comtesse which - in the absence of an available skip- needs full restoration.
To be fair, it is more or less complete- minus that lost in rust...
I can get what the chassis is supposed to look like, but it is the 'stabiliser wheel'/brake pedal bracket that the dreaded tin worm has left me guessing about.
I am hoping someone on the forum a. still has one and b. will take pity on me and provide photos and dimensions of this..
Any other info anyone may have on these dimiutive beasties would of course be very welcome...

Angus,
East Grinstead West Sussex

Isetta 300, Messerschmitt Kr200 x2, Wolseley 1500, Mini Cooper, Bedford Plaxton Embassy J2, Bedford Green Goddess.

Chris Thomas

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Re: Mini Comtesse Help!
« Reply #1 on: February 18, 2017, 08:43:06 PM »
Dear Angus

The best thing you can do is subscribe to Rumcar news for 2017 as there will be 4 pages dedicated to the Mini Comtesse.

The restoration job for you will be like pulling teeth.

Chris Thomas
Rumcar News

Big Al

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Re: Mini Comtesse Help!
« Reply #2 on: February 19, 2017, 08:37:40 AM »
I think there is partial cover on this topic on a previous thread on the Comtesse on this forum. An interrogation of the files might yield the info you need. Not least the underneath of Steve Mandells car.

There seem to be quite a number of these cars escaped from France now, so with that and the French owners, there is a pool of interest. Sadly it does seem to be hard work to access a unified source of information, but I am informed that this is the modern, and better way of things, with FaceBook, and other temporary, and fashionable, media dividing the information into a kaleidoscope of dispirate resources. I must say, I was glad to sell my example off, for getting accurate info was very hard work.
Messerschmitt set, Goggo Darts, Heinkel 175, Fiat Jolly, Autobianchi, Fairthorpe Electron Minor, Borgward, Isuzu Trooper
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Held - MG Magnette ZB & 4/44
For sale - Vellam Isetta, Bamby, AC Type 70, Velorex, Church Pod, Reliant Mk5, KR200,  Saab 96, Bellemy Trials, Citroen BXs

angus fognozzle

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Re: Mini Comtesse Help!
« Reply #3 on: February 19, 2017, 09:36:33 AM »
Dear Angus

The best thing you can do is subscribe to Rumcar news for 2017 as there will be 4 pages dedicated to the Mini Comtesse.

The restoration job for you will be like pulling teeth.

Chris Thomas
Rumcar News

ooh! Fab! - ironically I'm an Oral Surgeon by trade so if it is like pulling teeth I'll be fine!!

steven mandell

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Re: Mini Comtesse Help!
« Reply #4 on: February 19, 2017, 11:04:44 AM »
Nothing very complex or hard to recreate here.
However an improvement in the distribution of forces through the body shell is sorely needed, as my training wheel mount on the side opposite the car pedaling pedal has partially punched through the fiberglass, as a result of its intended use.
Having a solid rubber wheel attached to a fiberglass shell, with no intervening suspension for it, or even the single 8" front and central drive wheel is clearly a solution to the tip over problem that creates problems of its own.
The transition from 3 wheel contact to 4, is therefore an abrupt and undignified event.
Bit like a new heart pacemaker with built in electric shock resuscitation capability, in that it can feel like it sends you into cardiac arrest if it becomes engaged, but in actuality likely saved you from the casualty that you thought you were headed for by so doing.

Let me know exactly what you are looking to find out, and I'll snap a pic or take measurements for you....If Stuart doesn't beat me to it.
« Last Edit: February 19, 2017, 11:07:06 AM by steven mandell »

angus fognozzle

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Re: Mini Comtesse Help!
« Reply #5 on: February 19, 2017, 09:16:47 PM »
Nothing very complex or hard to recreate here.
However an improvement in the distribution of forces through the body shell is sorely needed, as my training wheel mount on the side opposite the car pedaling pedal has partially punched through the fiberglass, as a result of its intended use.
Having a solid rubber wheel attached to a fiberglass shell, with no intervening suspension for it, or even the single 8" front and central drive wheel is clearly a solution to the tip over problem that creates problems of its own.
The transition from 3 wheel contact to 4, is therefore an abrupt and undignified event.
Bit like a new heart pacemaker with built in electric shock resuscitation capability, in that it can feel like it sends you into cardiac arrest if it becomes engaged, but in actuality likely saved you from the casualty that you thought you were headed for by so doing.

Let me know exactly what you are looking to find out, and I'll snap a pic or take measurements for you....If Stuart doesn't beat me to it.

Thats' a bit more reassuring!
There is not much left of the pedal bracket; think I can figure out the dimensions from the remains on the opposite side and width of the 'axle' but could do with rough idea of gauge of steel and the shape, position and measurements of the brake cable sleeve bracket which is completely absent..
There appear to be the remains of two pedals- I assume the inner one was connected to absent ratchet and chain to the rear axle?

Barry

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Re: Mini Comtesse Help!
« Reply #6 on: February 19, 2017, 09:36:30 PM »
I will help if I can.  In Suffolk so would be a bit of a trek for you to see first-hand.

Mine has the moby engine.


steven mandell

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Re: Mini Comtesse Help!
« Reply #7 on: February 20, 2017, 10:37:32 AM »
The inner pedal on your left as you sit in the vehicle, has a swing away foot plate at its upper end so that it will less likely be engaged when attempting to brake by depressing the outer pedal by your same foot.
A long rod and then a cable attaches to it after the former disappears under the floor, with its attached cable finally winding through the near end of a short length of chain that rides over the gear teeth of a sprocket just inside of its same sided rear wheel.
There is also a long spring attached to the far end of the chain to provide a pedal return to forward rest position, as this is needed to combine with the ratcheting mechanism's effect, to allow a resumption of your pedaling strokes as soon as desired.

The ratcheting mechanism is identical to those used in bicycles that allow you to back spin your pedal assembly whilst continuing to travel forward, and is therefore invisibly encased in the very slim case that connects your chain sprocket to your rear axle.

More specific questions will get me back out to the corner of my barn with a vernier caliper with dial indicator, as well as a measuring tape and camera.
So get all your questions down to words to make my small trek most useful to you.

angus fognozzle

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Re: Mini Comtesse Help!
« Reply #8 on: February 20, 2017, 01:00:07 PM »
The inner pedal on your left as you sit in the vehicle, has a swing away foot plate at its upper end so that it will less likely be engaged when attempting to brake by depressing the outer pedal by your same foot.
A long rod and then a cable attaches to it after the former disappears under the floor, with its attached cable finally winding through the near end of a short length of chain that rides over the gear teeth of a sprocket just inside of its same sided rear wheel.
There is also a long spring attached to the far end of the chain to provide a pedal return to forward rest position, as this is needed to combine with the ratcheting mechanism's effect, to allow a resumption of your pedaling strokes as soon as desired.

The ratcheting mechanism is identical to those used in bicycles that allow you to back spin your pedal assembly whilst continuing to travel forward, and is therefore invisibly encased in the very slim case that connects your chain sprocket to your rear axle.

More specific questions will get me back out to the corner of my barn with a vernier caliper with dial indicator, as well as a measuring tape and camera.
So get all your questions down to words to make my small trek most useful to you.
Than would be great- the initial questions were really based on what was actually missing and hence no reference point (you can kind of see the problem from the attached photo); the further logic was that theres something to be said for getting brakes to work before moving onto motive aspects but to be fair the rear axle is seized anyway.
If I may, Ill be back in touch once I have investigated fully...
Thank you again!