Author Topic: Very early Model 70 restoration  (Read 380 times)

st185cs

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Re: Very early Model 70 restoration
« Reply #15 on: December 05, 2017, 07:23:23 PM »
Nice update!

The lights coming on one at a time is so sweet - as if TWC is just waking up ever-so-slowly after a 14 year deep sleep :-)

Have you plans to repaint?

steven mandell

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Re: Very early Model 70 restoration
« Reply #16 on: December 06, 2017, 10:08:21 AM »
Hubnut,
I got caught up watching some of your videos since you first posted.
They are quite entertaining!
If you don't mind me asking, how and why does Hagerty support you?
I think that just a bit cleaned up and professionally directed you could find yourself more successfully occupied as a low budget grass roots "Wheeler Dealer" alternative.  Sort of a survivalist record of your excursions into the high risk abyss of bargain hunting relying on but a single simple carry on tool box and your wits to make it home, and  even profitable in a short term.
No need or want to get slowed down by elaborate fixes, as that will make for greater efficiency of entertainment production, and that segment has already been played out by others at much greater expense of time and money.
Then you'd have more time and budget to do the things that you most like doing, and I'd have something more interesting to watch on the tv.
Could be you've stumbled upon an interesting and rewarding career, rather than just an exciting pass time.
It depends on what you make of it.

Now to your post.
Interesting that one can benefit from love taps on a Dynastarter, and that the other electrics slowly came to life on their own.
Do you think that you knocked the brushes loose, and that electrons build up pressure until they jump a gap of sorts?  I haven't ever heard that electrons do this, but would appreciate knowing why it seems that they do.

DaveMiller

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Re: Very early Model 70 restoration
« Reply #17 on: December 06, 2017, 12:44:07 PM »
I'm thinking that, rather than electrons (getting bored and) jumping gaps, perhaps when the current was first applied, there was resistance somewhere (probably at the bulb contacts) from dirt or corrosion.  This would have caused the bulbs to light very dimly (perhaps imperceptibly), but caused heat at the point of poor contact.  The contacts would then slightly expand/move, producing a better contact?  Perhaps ...

HubNut

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Re: Very early Model 70 restoration
« Reply #18 on: December 13, 2017, 09:21:23 PM »
I suspect it's actually more to do with something in the fusebox, as I lost electrics entirely again yesterday. Poking around under the dash got things working again but annoyingly, I'm not sure which wire/fuse that got jiggled made things work again. It was very odd - complete loss of electrics. Nothing worked at all, despite proven battery voltage.

I have so very nearly got this running. A few coughs, a few impressive backfires through the carb but she's not quite getting there. Will check through the fuel system tomorrow. I've fitted an ignition amplifier which has got me as far as some actual spark.

The Hagerty thing is a deal just to sponsor my videos, which will follow the rebuild of this car through to attending Hagerty's Festival of the Unexceptional event next summer. I have no plans to repaint the car.

HubNut

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Re: Very early Model 70 restoration
« Reply #19 on: December 14, 2017, 03:59:06 PM »
It runs!


Powerspark ignition booster and fresh fuel and she's away. Fuel pump works, but isn't drawing from the tank, so I rigged up a fuel can. Exhaust blew apart almost immediately, which isn't exactly surprising.

So, I really need to get on and find some parts. Service items, drive belts for the Dynastart and an exhaust seem like the priorities, but I'll also need to go through the brakes before I try going for a drive.

Barry

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Re: Very early Model 70 restoration
« Reply #20 on: December 14, 2017, 05:03:02 PM »
One filled-up with modern two star, the rubber joining the fuel line to the tank (and either side of the fuel filter) will disintegrate.  I thought my tank had rusted through but it happened on three of my cars.  Exhaust system from Mark possibly.

HubNut

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Re: Very early Model 70 restoration
« Reply #21 on: Today at 09:46:22 AM »
You're spot on I reckon Barry. I did pour a little fuel into the tank, and that now seems to be on my garage floor. Sadly, as the garage is part of the house, the whole house stank of petrol this morning! I may be in the bad books...

But, here's a video update.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ipP6nnD7Wcg&feature=youtu.be

steven mandell

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Re: Very early Model 70 restoration
« Reply #22 on: Today at 11:46:12 AM »
HubNut,
Loved your video because it's heartening to see someone else going through all the unanticipated machinations required to get a long neglected micro car back in the running.  Especially to be seeing it performed in conditions so similar to what I might be dealing with if it were not for the temperate clime that I am lucky to enjoy at this time of year.
Very similar to what I just went through getting my Goggo TS 400 sunroofless saloon going after a 17 year slumber in the desert sun last summer.  Not to mention the even greater interval preceeding that since it had travelled under it's own power.
Also similar goings on when my Seab Flipper reluctantly allowed me to gradually stir it's electrics and engine back to life the year before.  When it was first hooked up to a good battery, only a left turn signal would come on, but not blink- nothing else electrical in the entire car worked until attended to.  So you have been a bit luckier than I in that department.
May I suggest a carb disassembly and clean out of it's jets after you have replaced the fuel lines, and washed out the tank?   Seeing as your rig actually has a fuel pump, might as well through in a low restriction fuel filter while your at it in case something shakes loose in the tank when you hit the road with it.

I'm looking forward to seeing your first drive video.

A bit worried about that metallic clunking I heard a few times before the engine got fully running on both cylinders.  Hope it's not a rod bearing or something similarly serious.  Some new oil and a good bit of luck may be in order here.
Barring the preceding worry, a couple of hours with a rotary wire brush followed by your proprietary black rust paint on the rusted ferrous bits, and some of the finest grade steel wool on the aluminum pieces in the engine compartment should make the under bonnet view much more inviting, and inspire you to get it all dialed in just that much better.
Happy motoring!
« Last Edit: Today at 11:48:56 AM by steven mandell »