Author Topic: More micros in Practical Classics  (Read 18979 times)

darrg

  • Guest
More micros in Practical Classics
« on: December 18, 2005, 05:03:22 PM »
Just had the new Practical Classics mag (dated Feb 2006!) and it has a couple of bits of micro interest. Firstly, there is a four-page feature on Paul Dixon's restoration of BMW Isetta reg. 98 BXU. Secondly there is a spread of the "Record-Breaking Superstar Cars" in which, tucked between the likes of Ferraris, Morgans and McLarens, you will find a Peel P50 - the "smallest production car built" . Their fors & againsts are: for - amazing design; against - You'll fall down manholes. The illustration shows EME 538B in action.

P50

  • Prolific Poster
  • *****
  • Posts: 555
Re: More micros in Practical Classics
« Reply #1 on: January 01, 2006, 09:37:30 PM »
Indeed I saw that. Eyebrows slightly raised at what they consider their value to be.   Â£800 - £2000.

I'll take 10 if you dont mind. Oh, an a couple of Tridents for £3k a piece...     
"Men of worth act like men of worth, and men of genius, who produce
things beautiful and excellent, shine forth far better when other people
praise them than when they boast so confidently of their own achievements."
-Benvenuto Cellini

Dan Rodd

  • Guest
Re: More micros in Practical Classics
« Reply #2 on: January 02, 2006, 07:03:31 PM »
Just out of interest as i know i will never be able to own one,what prices have people on here paid for one or know of people paying for one?


P50

  • Prolific Poster
  • *****
  • Posts: 555
Re: More micros in Practical Classics
« Reply #3 on: January 03, 2006, 01:24:37 PM »
It's all cloak and dagger.  They seem to change hands by private treaty.  Last advertised genuine car was in Practical Classics. A couple of years ago. I don't know what it finally went for.

Maybe a long lost Peel will pop up on Ebay. That'd be one to put in your watchlist!   
"Men of worth act like men of worth, and men of genius, who produce
things beautiful and excellent, shine forth far better when other people
praise them than when they boast so confidently of their own achievements."
-Benvenuto Cellini

Dan Rodd

  • Guest
Re: More micros in Practical Classics
« Reply #4 on: January 03, 2006, 05:39:31 PM »
Its a bit like some secret club where you can only join when an owner dies!

Id much rather one popped up in my garden!

robadob

  • Guest
Re: More micros in Practical Classics
« Reply #5 on: January 03, 2006, 10:40:52 PM »
 Hi All, I never fell in a manhole with mine. I sold my two for £45 and £250, But that was in 1976. Bob.

P50

  • Prolific Poster
  • *****
  • Posts: 555
Re: More micros in Practical Classics
« Reply #6 on: January 04, 2006, 09:49:18 PM »
I spoke to a chap at a show last year.  A kid saw him with his normal bubble in the street and said he knew where there was a boxy vandalised car called a Peel in a derelict council garage.

They both trotted down there and the council had cleared the whole row out just days earlier. How gutted would you be?!! An empty space... One more Peel to the great scrapyard upstairs.        Rumour has it Twostrokes in Stanmore done an insurance job in the 60's and chucked a few Tridents in a quarry.  I dont believe that fable really. They apparantly gave one or two away with a 'proper' car sale also. A bloke saw my Peel and said he got one new in '65 as his dad said he couldn't have a moped. That got rolled and scrapped n 68 I think!  There's another.

Peel built more than twice the amount of Tridents than P50's (supposed 46 vs late 90's) so I suppose there's a few still out there. Mind you, the P50 has flat perspex/glass so breakage didn't render it unusable in its day. But when a Trident dome broke then one assumes into the skip it went. Or the kids were given it to bomb around a field until it seized and died!   The Hammonds Trident was a tool shed in the garden!

Oh for a time machine!  Times and tastes change..
"Men of worth act like men of worth, and men of genius, who produce
things beautiful and excellent, shine forth far better when other people
praise them than when they boast so confidently of their own achievements."
-Benvenuto Cellini

Dan Rodd

  • Guest
Re: More micros in Practical Classics
« Reply #7 on: January 05, 2006, 05:49:21 PM »
such a shame about that one in the garage.
They are out there though,somewhere.

You dont seem to hear much form people who actually USED them when they were new though?

i think they are absolutely lovely cars but know i will never afford one.

P50

  • Prolific Poster
  • *****
  • Posts: 555
Re: More micros in Practical Classics
« Reply #8 on: January 06, 2006, 02:06:30 PM »
I think mine was used in its day. The sceen has an arc score where wiper rubbed. And I have a little play in the rack. 

But most people probably came to the same conclusion after the incredible salesman had done his deed. They're utterly useless!

Bad brakes, no dampers, no reverse, no heating, no performance, no brake lights. Pretty much a coffin on 60's go-cart wheels!  Plus the Trident can roll easily and is a sauna in the summer.    But they're brilliant because they're bonkers! That's why I love my Scootacar. It has a fantastic shape but is usable..   
"Men of worth act like men of worth, and men of genius, who produce
things beautiful and excellent, shine forth far better when other people
praise them than when they boast so confidently of their own achievements."
-Benvenuto Cellini

Dan Rodd

  • Guest
Re: More micros in Practical Classics
« Reply #9 on: January 06, 2006, 04:17:10 PM »
Im a Brockhouse Corgi scooter entusiast (the civilian folding bike based on the ww2 paracute welbike),and they are very similar in terms of being bought after believing the salesman,then realising that hey wee built to austere standards and were not very usable,
i would like to get one of mine ridable for this years Founders day rally,as its the 60th anniversary of the Corgi's launch.

What type of peel do you own P50?

How easy(and cheap) would it be to get a replica?

P50

  • Prolific Poster
  • *****
  • Posts: 555
Re: More micros in Practical Classics
« Reply #10 on: January 06, 2006, 06:45:13 PM »
Yes I have a P50. Commonly known as a mk2. Mk1's had a direct steering arrangement like a kids pedal car and the O/S lower sill area was detachable for access. Also had a bit of bent tube on n/s rear corner to stop it tipping if you were giving it some! One has to wonder why they bothered to update it at all ? I mean it's not like they were selling them in volume. Perhaps they thought they would. Must have been hilarious watching a customer sign the H.P papers shake hands, get given the keys and trundle off!  People laughed at them in their day says a road test I have.  But mags in those days gave glowing reports because of advertising revenue. Todays mags will go for the jugular!  I suppose old ladies probably bought them. It was 'cheaper than walking' says the brochure..

As far as a replica is concerned  you want to talk to Andy Carter. He sells shells and other bits and bobs.

Here's his link.        http://homepage.ntlworld.com/andy.carter/

I like Monkeybikes and have a tuned Z50. Hope to get a CZ100 soon. Just like all bonzai machines really.
"Men of worth act like men of worth, and men of genius, who produce
things beautiful and excellent, shine forth far better when other people
praise them than when they boast so confidently of their own achievements."
-Benvenuto Cellini

Dan Rodd

  • Guest
Re: More micros in Practical Classics
« Reply #11 on: January 06, 2006, 09:30:25 PM »
You certainly dont see any pictures of street scenes in the 60's with a peel bouncing down the highstreet or parked next to the post office(could probably go inside!)

Jean

  • Global Moderator
  • Prolific Poster
  • *****
  • Posts: 698
    • www.rumcars.org
Re: More micros in Practical Classics
« Reply #12 on: January 09, 2006, 10:08:54 PM »
Our Peel P50 was found on the outskirts of Newquay, Cornwall.  It had been used by an elderly lady for going shopping into Newquay and it was all up hill on the way home! We bought it in 1977 and had to pay £265 for it.  Edwin restored it and got it running and road tested it by driving on the pavement up to my daughter who lived about five doors away.  I had to go and rescue him though because the back wheel got stuck in a pothole!  However, a couple of years later we took it with our Scootacar to Germany and I think we can claim that it was the first P50 to be driven up the Harz mountain course from Story and made it on to German TV.  Our Trident bought a little later was nearly grounds for a divorce when I saw the wreck with a shattered dome which had cost £300.  Yes, it had in fact been used a tool shed, but by this time there was no stopping Edwin fortunately most of his other acquisitions cost a fraction of the Peels.
Jean
Register of Unusual Microcars

CORK

  • Occasional
  • **
  • Posts: 10
Re: More micros in Practical Classics
« Reply #13 on: March 10, 2006, 07:34:15 PM »
PEEL`S IN A QUARRY NEAR STANMORE WOULD THAT BE A FLOODED QUARRY IVE GOT THE SCUBA GEAR IF ANYONES GOT A BETTER IDEA OF WHICH QUARRY THEY MIGHT BE IN

REGARDS

JEREMY

P50

  • Prolific Poster
  • *****
  • Posts: 555
Re: More micros in Practical Classics
« Reply #14 on: March 14, 2006, 10:14:07 PM »
Sorry my man but the Two Strokes fable of yore is not that simple.

It is alleged that the Peels (Tridents I assume since twice as many were built and at least ayear or two later than the P50's) were chucked in a quarry in the 60's and since then there is a building or an estate of kind sealing their fate in a concrete tomb.  However it must be just an old wives tale. I mean how/why would several cars get nicked?  doesn't add up.  Adds to the mystery of the greatest (read useless!) and mysterious micros of them all though...
"Men of worth act like men of worth, and men of genius, who produce
things beautiful and excellent, shine forth far better when other people
praise them than when they boast so confidently of their own achievements."
-Benvenuto Cellini