Author Topic: Hello, new to microcars  (Read 10831 times)

AndyL

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Re: Hello, new to microcars
« Reply #15 on: October 08, 2015, 01:36:37 PM »
I live and work in London, and can't honestly say that tallies with my experience, although I will agree people do spend far too much time looking at their smartphones, many of whom are often behind the wheel.
1959 LHD 3-wheel Isetta.

Big Al

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Re: Hello, new to microcars
« Reply #16 on: October 08, 2015, 05:21:50 PM »
Can you DIY a Smart? Not sure I want to try. All far to complicated and not minimalist. Depends what you want really. But you can see the problem. Folk are reluctant to drive Microcars, so buy newer/bigger things and then these become additions to what is a small car. As Bob observed elsewhere, you go back, and the smallest cars were very small, making a Classic Mini a big car.

Has anyone noticed the Duport on eBay? That is the sort of stuff that is relatively cheap, simple and Micro. Forget about Minis, Smarts and such, they are firmly in the light car world.
Messerschmitt set, Goggo Darts, Heinkel 175, Fiat Jolly, Autobianchi, Fairthorpe Electron Minor, Borgward, Isuzu Trooper
Citroen BX 17TZD & GTI 16v
Held - MG Magnette ZB & 4/44
For sale - Vellam Isetta, Bamby, AC Type 70, Velorex, Church Pod, Reliant Mk5, KR200,  Saab 96, Bellemy Trials, Citroen BXs

Barry

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Re: Hello, new to microcars
« Reply #17 on: October 08, 2015, 05:38:53 PM »
I agree that a Microcar should also be a minimalist car.  The Smart is far from that.  As far as DIY, I have yet to find out where the battery is! No spare wheel - just a tyre inflation juice kit which is somewhere under the footwell.  Cross the Smart off of the list then.

richard

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Re: Hello, new to microcars
« Reply #18 on: October 08, 2015, 06:48:41 PM »
Does any new car have a spare ? I know ours both don't
outside of a dog a book is mans best friend. Inside of a dog it's too dark to read .Groucho Marx 1895-1977

AndyL

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Re: Hello, new to microcars
« Reply #19 on: October 08, 2015, 08:14:55 PM »
Modern cars are just as DIY-able as the old ones were IMO, although thankfully you don't have to get under the bonnet very often.

I know ECU's bamboozle those brought up on clockwork ignition and carbs, but they rarely go wrong, if sensors fail the ECU usually tells you what is wrong if you know how to interrogate it. Mechanically the average banger these days isn't significantly more complex than they were back in the day.

What can be a problem is manufacturers retaining information. In answer to that I would stick to cars that have a bit of a cult following, that usually insures plenty of information out there.
1959 LHD 3-wheel Isetta.

Minidaz

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Re: Hello, new to microcars
« Reply #20 on: October 08, 2015, 08:24:43 PM »
If I had the space, I'd have a whole assortment of cars, standard size and micro, so having one particular type to go for isn't that straightforward - although my eldest ( 12 ) really wants a Heinkel after getting to sit in one at a recent show.

It might be a case of rather than buying something slower and cheaper, I wait a bit longer, save a few more pennies, get to a few shows, check out what's out there, and buy something more suitable.

And Smarts are quite cool, but prefer my not every day car to be a bit older  :)

plas man

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Re: Hello, new to microcars
« Reply #21 on: October 08, 2015, 08:39:04 PM »
if you dont mind getting your hands dirty , and like DIY and a bit of customising get your self a Bond - one of the cheapest micro's ? , also the easy to work on Villiers engine , and spares too .

steven mandell

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Re: Hello, new to microcars
« Reply #22 on: October 09, 2015, 03:09:52 AM »
I believe Berkelys are similarly undervalued, and less expensive to keep running, with the possible exception of the under engineered bushed differential.
They certainly are a lot more attractive than Bonds, but then again if awkward under dog is your chosen alter ego- you could stick with a Bond.
Otherwise you can have what looks like a mini E type- Cobra hybrid for 1/20 th or less the cost.
Even more affordable in 3 wheeled T60 form.   The hardtop T60's strike a chord with me as being attractive in frontal view, and baroque- bizarre from the rear.

For a most affordable Bond- if you can stand the look of the long nosed types, go for one of those, as the earliest ones are more cute and sought after (so more expensive) despite being crude in the extreme.
Ironically this level of crudity in the earliest examples actually enhances value, as it is a window on the evolution of the more modern- dare I say drivable, micro cars.
« Last Edit: October 09, 2015, 04:14:35 AM by steven mandell »

1bubble10 (paul smith)

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Re: Hello, new to microcars
« Reply #23 on: October 09, 2015, 06:58:50 AM »
The issue of engine size is very much a personal thing. I have owned an isetta and a bond minicar and currently own an ape 50 and a peel p50 replica. The bond minicar was a very capable machine - however, my one was unreliable never know if I would get home again. The Ape 5o has got a 133cc engine in it and will cruise all day at 40mph and has more if required (it has been totally reliable too) Not too sur I would be up for travelling 100's of ,ile to a show in it though but I don't think I would in any microcar apart from the likes of your 2cvs and fiat 126.
I do admit that the P50 has its limitations but the fun factor of driving it around the town makes up for any of its limitation.

It all about what you want from a car which is a personal thing - I drive my cars every week and only attend a couple of shows in a year if that - The trailering to a show 100 miles away a couple of times a year for me would be no disadvantage.
Bamby P50, Piaggio Ape 50

Chris Thomas

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Re: Hello, new to microcars
« Reply #24 on: October 09, 2015, 03:01:18 PM »
Ahh-Sol.

The words of Chairman Moi-say-dell remind me of sayings of wise Chinese sage.

"It does not matter how slowly you go, so long as you do not stop". Confucius

Chris Thomas

Big Al

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Re: Hello, new to microcars
« Reply #25 on: October 09, 2015, 03:58:16 PM »
I think it pays to save up to budget for what you really want, if it is within achievement. If that might be a while an astute purchase of a lesser machine will fill the gap between deciding, saving and buying. But always try and scrounge a go in your choice. Many a classic is a great disappointment once you get behind the wheel. Each person takes different things in different ways and its better to realize the choice might be wrong before committing to far into an ownership. Case in point Trienkel. Some folk never master the gearchange, even when it is set up perfectly. I do not know why, it just Is.
Messerschmitt set, Goggo Darts, Heinkel 175, Fiat Jolly, Autobianchi, Fairthorpe Electron Minor, Borgward, Isuzu Trooper
Citroen BX 17TZD & GTI 16v
Held - MG Magnette ZB & 4/44
For sale - Vellam Isetta, Bamby, AC Type 70, Velorex, Church Pod, Reliant Mk5, KR200,  Saab 96, Bellemy Trials, Citroen BXs

steven mandell

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Re: Hello, new to microcars
« Reply #26 on: October 09, 2015, 05:44:04 PM »
Trienkel- Trojan Hienkel are also relatively undervalued in the UK, in comparison to Isettas.
I see them to be an all round more advanced design, but for some reason not known to myself seem to be somewhat more prone to be not set up right or driven by the ham handed.
Theories?

Chris Thomas

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Re: Hello, new to microcars
« Reply #27 on: October 09, 2015, 06:05:06 PM »
The reality is that the Heinkel was designed by an aero engineer rather than a fridge magnet

Chris Thomas

richard

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Re: Hello, new to microcars
« Reply #28 on: October 09, 2015, 06:27:42 PM »
 ;D
outside of a dog a book is mans best friend. Inside of a dog it's too dark to read .Groucho Marx 1895-1977

AndyL

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Re: Hello, new to microcars
« Reply #29 on: October 09, 2015, 07:23:39 PM »
I think the spares situation helped to suppress values on Heinkel/Trojans.

You can get near enough anything for an Isetta, but Heinkels historically were a bit more of a mend and make do motor. I believe more spares are available nowadays, but once things get tinged, it's difficult to change peoples perception.
1959 LHD 3-wheel Isetta.