Author Topic: Breakdown cover  (Read 8057 times)

chrispbug

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Breakdown cover
« on: February 23, 2016, 11:59:47 PM »
Can anyone advise a cover they use for their classic cars ?

Big Al

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Re: Breakdown cover
« Reply #1 on: February 24, 2016, 12:14:03 AM »
Adrian Flux, blood wagon service comes with the insurance deal for a small charge, but includes abroad, does not cover home. Suits me fine, as if at home I should able to fix it. Saves a deal of money over additional fees to a second party.
Think of it from the insurers point of view, they want your car off the road, where its safe from harm and a potential claim from the increased risk in exposure on the side of the road.
Messerschmitt set, Goggo Darts, Heinkel 175, Fiat Jolly, Autobianchi, Fairthorpe Electron Minor, Borgward, Isuzu Trooper
Citroen BX 17TZD & GTI 16v
Held - MG Magnette ZB & 4/44
For sale - Vellam Isetta, Bamby, AC Type 70, Velorex, Church Pod, Reliant Mk5, KR200,  Saab 96, Bellemy Trials, Citroen BXs

AndrewG

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Re: Breakdown cover
« Reply #2 on: February 24, 2016, 02:10:02 PM »
"Breakdown cover" - for a moment I though you meant that you break down so often that you wanted to carry one of those gazebo things for the times when it was raining....

plas man

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Re: Breakdown cover
« Reply #3 on: February 24, 2016, 03:10:56 PM »
the good old days - long distance Bonders often known to carry a complete engine , as well as the compulsory spanners/Villiers tools/plugs/cables/chain/coil- the list is endless --- , and the trailer , makes you wonder how we got going !
 thank god for the RAC .

Jim Janecek

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Re: Breakdown cover
« Reply #4 on: February 24, 2016, 03:31:41 PM »
In the USA, many people use covers made by COVERCRAFT.   They don't sell directly but supply many dealers.
The main UK portal would be http://www.covercraft-europe.com
click on the "compare fabrics" link and then click on stuff once there.

For indoor use I have been using some variation of the "DUST STOP" type that is fitted and while bulky when stored, it works well indoors when on the vehicle. 
http://www.covercraft-europe.com/cartlink/index.php?cust_id=europe_r&prod_id=ccdp

They have a selection of ready made "custom" covers for a variety of vehicles. The BMW Isetta is just one, although they never list it on their website (they do show Messerschmitt though...). They can also whip one up if you provide them with some measurements.

Just make sure whatever cover you get is not all plastic. It needs to "breathe" or you will just trap moisture under the cover.
I have 2002 BMW convertible that I cover over the winter with a generic cover I got at an Auto Supply Store for less than 50 USD and while thinner material,  it works fine

Rob Dobie

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Re: Breakdown cover
« Reply #5 on: February 24, 2016, 04:11:30 PM »
Breakdown Cover. There was me thinking is was an insurance that the AA, RAC and many others get you to pay if or when your car goes boom on a trip out.
Ain't got nuffink now except memories.

Big Al

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Re: Breakdown cover
« Reply #6 on: February 24, 2016, 06:06:28 PM »
Ah, the great Atlantic language divide.
Messerschmitt set, Goggo Darts, Heinkel 175, Fiat Jolly, Autobianchi, Fairthorpe Electron Minor, Borgward, Isuzu Trooper
Citroen BX 17TZD & GTI 16v
Held - MG Magnette ZB & 4/44
For sale - Vellam Isetta, Bamby, AC Type 70, Velorex, Church Pod, Reliant Mk5, KR200,  Saab 96, Bellemy Trials, Citroen BXs

AndrewG

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Re: Breakdown cover
« Reply #7 on: February 24, 2016, 06:35:38 PM »
the good old days - long distance Bonders often known to carry a complete engine....
Kawasaki actually built their three-cylinder two-stroke bikes in the 1970s with three threaded holes in a frame bracket under the seat - which carried the three spare spark plugs that got you home if you had too much fun on the way to somewhere.  To be honest, they needed another place to store spare sets of clean underwear.

Big Al

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Re: Breakdown cover
« Reply #8 on: February 24, 2016, 07:57:14 PM »
Schmitters combine the needs of both requirements in one, hence the option of platinum coated electrodes.

Actually the Karo Tips book gives a good list of things to pack in your Schmitt to get you home if your doing local mileage, or international mileage, including the book of course. This led to the introduction of Barry Boxes that went under the rear seats to put your stuff in. This helped the Schmitts become the most reliable cars out on runs during the days when folk were driving, alledgedly.
Did any other Clubs offer the same sort of thing?
Messerschmitt set, Goggo Darts, Heinkel 175, Fiat Jolly, Autobianchi, Fairthorpe Electron Minor, Borgward, Isuzu Trooper
Citroen BX 17TZD & GTI 16v
Held - MG Magnette ZB & 4/44
For sale - Vellam Isetta, Bamby, AC Type 70, Velorex, Church Pod, Reliant Mk5, KR200,  Saab 96, Bellemy Trials, Citroen BXs

DaveMiller

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Re: Breakdown cover
« Reply #9 on: February 24, 2016, 09:07:22 PM »
The Bond factory would supply a touring pack, for those venturing abroad.  I can't now lay my hands on the details, but I guess it it would have spare throttle, clutch and brake cables, gaskets, clutch plates and primary + drive chains.  (The driver would of course normally have a spare wheel and spare plug).

I think I read that the factory would then re-imburse you for the parts you didn't use.

These days, it seems odd that those parts were regarded as so "special" - for long trips only.  I have them all (except the primary chain)  in the boot of each of my Bonds!

Jim Janecek

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Re: Breakdown cover
« Reply #10 on: February 24, 2016, 09:54:32 PM »
 ::)

Big Al

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Re: Breakdown cover
« Reply #11 on: February 24, 2016, 10:06:11 PM »
Never mind, Jim. No info is wasted. Covering a classic car is not as straight forward as some folk think. I have seen utter disasters, particularly with GRP cars where the colour has changed from deep crimson to pink, or from green to a sort of yellow, where the coverings had touched. Also osmosis strike.
Messerschmitt set, Goggo Darts, Heinkel 175, Fiat Jolly, Autobianchi, Fairthorpe Electron Minor, Borgward, Isuzu Trooper
Citroen BX 17TZD & GTI 16v
Held - MG Magnette ZB & 4/44
For sale - Vellam Isetta, Bamby, AC Type 70, Velorex, Church Pod, Reliant Mk5, KR200,  Saab 96, Bellemy Trials, Citroen BXs

Rusty Chrome (Malcolm Parker)

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Re: Breakdown cover
« Reply #12 on: February 25, 2016, 12:02:52 AM »
So do I break down this thread into breakdown cover, a cover for a breakdowns, breakdown protection, breakdown insurance or something about misfiring on all cylinders?
Malcolm
Bond Mk D - "The Bond Minicar solves your problem"
Nobel 200 - "Almost as cheap as breathing!"

Big Al

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Re: Breakdown cover
« Reply #13 on: February 25, 2016, 10:15:44 AM »
Well only those who drive the cars any distance will know the answer to the original question. Some, like me, have taken the view we can always fix our little lads if they malfunction. So have not bothered with breakdown cover. For with odd cars like ours that generally means, if the owner cannot fix it, Mr Mobile Mechanic cannot. So its a drag to a safe house. Though at times a rummage in his box of bits comes up trumps. I gained cover by default of my insurance scheme.

So the real answer to this question comes from the sub classification of those who drive their car and require better cover than the limited drag you out of danger one I am on, for what ever reason. So far no one has answered that question, so perhaps that subclass is vacant here, as reality is most people do not do the sort of mileages that warrant that additional expense. Hence the deviation onto other headlines.

Personally I find it rather smart of Bond to offer such a package / service. Would that manufacturers now where so friendly and helpful. You can see why folk stuck to their Bonds. I suppose the modern equivalent is seen as leasing your car. Not quite the same ambiance though, has it?

Of course covering the car is an option. Perhaps the MEC should market breakdown cheap. If you car breaks down, you dial in. The nearest MEC member attends in his trusty Schmitt. Gives you a hand to push the car to a suitable spot and turn it into a facsimile of a bush using one the Club's Camouflage Quilted Cover. Safely hidden you can then return at you leisure to collect the car later by whatever method suits your needs. All you need is to join the MEC. Ah, there is the problem. You cannot, as it has not taken new members for about three years, save internet ones. Damn, another cunning plan destroyed.

I like the idea of Breakdown Insurance. Pay the premium and we will pay out if you car does not break down in use. I sense a fortune to be made! Like employing Scottish boy scouts to turn off peoples petrol taps. Based on a very amusing tale, by the way.

Well that about covers it, but I cannot fix it I am afraid. Bit like the cars, really.
Messerschmitt set, Goggo Darts, Heinkel 175, Fiat Jolly, Autobianchi, Fairthorpe Electron Minor, Borgward, Isuzu Trooper
Citroen BX 17TZD & GTI 16v
Held - MG Magnette ZB & 4/44
For sale - Vellam Isetta, Bamby, AC Type 70, Velorex, Church Pod, Reliant Mk5, KR200,  Saab 96, Bellemy Trials, Citroen BXs

DaveMiller

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Re: Breakdown cover
« Reply #14 on: February 25, 2016, 11:42:56 AM »
I agree, Al - but I think you miss the main point of (decent) breakdown cover:  the "getting your car back to your house" bit, more formally known as "recovery".

If something minor happens when I'm out, I can probably do something at road-side.  If it's more serious and I can't then, as you say, the call-out engineer and any garage they might take me to probably can't immediately, either.  That's when it's nice for them to put the car on a flatbed, and deliver it home for you.

Having that sort of cover has made me much more likely to use the cars, which is good.  In 19 years of using the Isetta, then the Bonds, I've had to use the service only 3 times.  As it happens, each time I was heading home anyway:  Isetta having spat out its bottom-of-cylinder-barrel gasket, near Derby (and the 35 minute wait, plus the nice 55-mile ride home in the lorry got us there faster than we would have done ...), Bond Mk G having suddenly burned out its electronic ignition booster with 14 miles to go (and I didn't fancy re-wiring to original in the pouring rain), and Bond Mk A having got its clutch too hot to separate, late at night (fixed later by re-doing the pedal/cable arrangement for more movement).