Author Topic: Wheel splicing  (Read 11594 times)

Big Al

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Re: Wheel splicing
« Reply #30 on: May 10, 2016, 08:40:41 AM »
Ah, the light dawns on the un imaginative. I see how it works now. A nice aid, but as with most tools, there will always be a task beyond its scope, like a complex curve. Its ever the engineers task to adapt and problem solve. But a basic quality of tooling is always a better place to start from. Allowing a top quality solution in a shorter time. Its great that there is a spread of skill bases across the contributors. I learn much from these seemingly unimportant topics, to me. It would be easy not to click on it, and remain ignorant.
Messerschmitt set, Goggo Darts, Heinkel 175, Fiat Jolly, Autobianchi, Fairthorpe Electron Minor, Borgward, Isuzu Trooper
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For sale - Vellam Isetta, Bamby, AC Type 70, Velorex, Church Pod, Reliant Mk5, KR200,  Saab 96, Bellemy Trials, Citroen BXs

steven mandell

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Re: Wheel splicing
« Reply #31 on: May 12, 2016, 11:25:42 AM »
Unless proven otherwise, I will have to agree with Al.
The small hemispherical footprint of my heavily framed mini C clamps's threaded rod was needed to apply a clamping force at just the right angle along the overlapping complex curves of my recipient and donor wheel's sections to allow a tracing of the portion to be cut off the donor wheel.
This clamping force needed to be applied within a small range of suitable angularity to create a delicate balance between a radial and perpendicular to the disk of the wheel component, and therefore had to be applied to the inner radius of the recipient wheel's outer bead flange by the aforementioned hemispherical tipped threaded rod of the C clamps.   This was so because it was necessary for them to seat inside the similarly angled radius of the recipient wheel's outer bead seat flange.
I know that this sounds incredibly complex,   :'( but it would become immediately apparent if the task were attempted.

Alternatively some very strong magnets might prove successful in accomplishing the same task. :)
« Last Edit: May 12, 2016, 11:51:18 AM by steven mandell »

richard

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Re: Wheel splicing
« Reply #32 on: May 12, 2016, 05:48:30 PM »
Absolutely convinced that all of the above would render your insurance absolutely null and void in the UK and therefore illegal on the road . If you doubt that try phoning them and telling them what you've done 🙂 #just saying
outside of a dog a book is mans best friend. Inside of a dog it's too dark to read .Groucho Marx 1895-1977

Big Al

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Re: Wheel splicing
« Reply #33 on: May 13, 2016, 08:02:34 AM »
Is that not being negative? If you have a wheel missing, fixing it seems to be an option, just so you can move the damned thing round the shed, or showground. Given a collection such as has been gathered here I would be inclined to assemble, or spend out on, one set of really good wheels and then move them between the cars I might want to drive on the road. A bit like having three racing cars and one £25k tuned engine. It resolves cost control, competitive edge - in this case insurance requirements, and you still have the satisfaction of proving that you can do a rather tricky repair.

Messerschmitt set, Goggo Darts, Heinkel 175, Fiat Jolly, Autobianchi, Fairthorpe Electron Minor, Borgward, Isuzu Trooper
Citroen BX 17TZD & GTI 16v
Held - MG Magnette ZB & 4/44
For sale - Vellam Isetta, Bamby, AC Type 70, Velorex, Church Pod, Reliant Mk5, KR200,  Saab 96, Bellemy Trials, Citroen BXs

richard

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Re: Wheel splicing
« Reply #34 on: May 13, 2016, 09:58:56 AM »
My comment not begative at all . If was VERY positive 😀 Ok whose going to be first to phone their insurance company and tell them you make your own road wheels 🙂
outside of a dog a book is mans best friend. Inside of a dog it's too dark to read .Groucho Marx 1895-1977

Peel replica, Steve Fisk

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Re: Wheel splicing
« Reply #35 on: May 13, 2016, 11:04:28 AM »
I agree to a certain extent but my peel passed the msva and I made all of that because I can weld , a weld can be bodged up to look good but weak as tin foil an msva man or who ever won't really be able to tell a bad weld until it brakes , If a part broke and caused an accident the builder would be blamed and strung up , the insurance would be void

plas man

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Re: Wheel splicing
« Reply #36 on: May 13, 2016, 03:49:36 PM »
My comment not begative at all . If was VERY positive 😀 Ok whose going to be first to phone their insurance company and tell them you make your own road wheels 🙂

don't worry , with all the left over bits a space saver spare can be made .

Rusty Chrome (Malcolm Parker)

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Re: Wheel splicing
« Reply #37 on: May 13, 2016, 07:15:06 PM »
I also hear what you're saying Richard, but it would come down to whether the insurance company defined this as a modification or as a repair. Unless as Steve says it's a really bad weld, significant modifications without approval are what the assessors will pick up on. Anyway, given that a huge proportion of the complaints about car insurers is about the quality of the repairs carried out by the insurer's repairers, they're hardly fit people to judge the quality of your workmanship! As my brother always used to tell me when he sold car insurance, the only way you will ever know if your insurance is any good is when you have to make a claim. Let's hope everyone on here keeps on avoiding that.
Malcolm
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steven mandell

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Re: Wheel splicing
« Reply #38 on: May 13, 2016, 07:28:34 PM »
Thank goodness that here in the wild west of the US, we don't have quite as much meddling by the government or insurance companies.
My wheel only has to answer to my own standard, and the wheel rung true , (both literally and figuratively) when I beat it within a modicum of denting it all round. :)

DaveMiller

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Re: Wheel splicing
« Reply #39 on: May 13, 2016, 07:52:15 PM »
I think Malcolm's right: we need to report to the insurance company any significant modification, but not usually any repair to original pattern.  We don't, for example, need to report if a section of sill is cut out and a new (equivalent) section is welded in.  I didn't (still don't) think of reporting that the front suspension frames on my Mk A Bond had shattered, and subsequently been welded back whole.  I reckon the crucial factor is whether the repair is up to strength, and how we determine that.

I'd feel confident (anyway) in following that logic ... and if necessary explaining it in court!