Author Topic: What class  (Read 2708 times)

Michael

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What class
« on: July 29, 2015, 10:04:14 PM »
Randomly looking at bits and pieces tonight and was trying to work out what weight my Trident will be and then from that what it would be classed as.

I have been working out if I will be allowed cable or hydraulic brakes. It looks like only cable brakes are allowed on very low powered cars.
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1bubble10 (paul smith)

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Re: What class
« Reply #1 on: July 30, 2015, 06:10:37 AM »
I use to have a secma funtech 50 (3 wheeled qpod with rear stabilizers) that had cabled drum brakes all round - the brakes were horrible - nothing to do with the cables though - on hard braking the car wanted to pull to one side dramatically - think it was to do with being one up with the seating position to one side and being incredibly light.

My ape 50 has hydraulic rears and cable front brakes and seams to be more than adequate even with the extra speed I have now got with the engine upgrade and 250kg inladen and 430kg fully laden.
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Big Al

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Re: What class
« Reply #2 on: July 30, 2015, 09:59:50 AM »
I assume the criteria is braking efficiency. A product of retardation against mass. Since better brakes are common on modern cars with 'better' technology, only light cars are going to get by with cable brakes.

If I read your meaning correctly you are not saying that there is a class of car that has to have cable brakes.

In the absence of many modern cable brake systems to pick from, I would think hydraulic might offer an easier answer. It rather depends where you have got to on development of the car. The best brakes in the world will not improve the stopping power on the limited surface area and rubber compound available from a 5 inch wheel/tyre. Such short trikes also have an increased tendency the fall over, if the braking is too rapid, or clumsy in application while cornering. So there needs to be some element of controllability to the pedal.
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Michael

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Re: What class
« Reply #3 on: July 30, 2015, 07:02:25 PM »
I am trying to limit the use of spacers between wheel and hub, which leaves the discs sitting quite a distance from the wheel due to having clear the caliber.

One quad bike I saw had 6" wheels with drum brakes, that sit in the wheel area.

Will go back to the drawing board and research some more.
Locost self build car.
3 Mk1 Raleigh Choppers, 2 Mk2 Raleigh Choppers
Mk2 Raleigh Chopper Tandem
Sinclair C5 Restored
Austin J40 Pedal Car to restore
Peel Trident Replica to build

Peel replica, Steve Fisk

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Re: What class
« Reply #4 on: August 01, 2015, 07:40:05 PM »
What's the problem with using spacers ?

Big Al

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Re: What class
« Reply #5 on: August 02, 2015, 08:00:40 AM »
Back to the centre of the wheel moving away from the centre of rotation. Spacers are normally used with offset rims.
Messerschmitt set, Goggo Darts, Heinkel 175, Fiat Jolly, Autobianchi, Fairthorpe Electron Minor, Borgward, Isuzu Trooper
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plas man

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Re: What class
« Reply #6 on: August 13, 2015, 09:00:26 PM »
I have just caught up with this thread , re hydraulic brakes if you are fitting from scratch the area of piston at the front should equal those at the rear ( 1/2 inch front , 2 x 1/4 inch rear , or whatever ) , I fitted the Bond Mk D with fluid brakes and all it does is lock up the wheels , and due to the 4 inch drum's/brake shoes and the light weight the car it tends to skid .
To overcome this I fitted a 10 inch hub/drum from the Mk G Bond this has cured the front wheel thus taking presure off the rear wheels ,
But to acommodate the 8 inch wheel on the 10 inch hub a spacer was machined with 4 and 6 hole fixing's , and to date this has not altered the cars stability or premature wear on the wheel bearings .
I hope you find this helpfull .